St. Paul Bike Blog

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GPOY, at least I am still upright. I designed the jersey for my old bike shop…not that you can see that much of it.

GPOY, at least I am still upright. I designed the jersey for my old bike shop…not that you can see that much of it.

In a tragic turn of events…

…a Fuji Team road bike passed away suddenly Thursday, August 24th around 4:35pm in St. Paul, MN. The bike was traveling west bound on Transfer Road carrying a passenger when it stopped working. The passenger attempted to revive the bike but was unsuccessful. The preliminary report by authorities suggests the bike died of natural causes as it was 15 years old. Foul play is not suspected and their will be no further investigation. The passenger told this reporter that the Fuji was a trusty ride in races, long tours, and commuting and will be sorely missed. The Fuji was listed as a “Component Donor” so a technician will remove all the bike parts that could be donated to help prolong the lives of other bicycles. There will be no service but the owner asks that you sign up your own bicycles into the Component Donor Program in remembrance. Please be advised that the photo of this accident is graphic and might be disturbing to some readers. Please move your children out of view of your computer before you look at this picture.

Fuji Team Tragedy

My daughter, Audrey Hull, was recently killed by a truck while riding her bicycle at the corner of 15th Av. and 4th St. in Minneapolis.

If the city had hired a bicycle and pedestrian coordinator years ago—a position that exists in many comparable cities—the changes now proposed for that demonstrably dangerous corner might have been in place on April 21, 2011, and Audrey might still be alive.

I urge Minneapolis to proceed with its plans to hire the bicyclist and pedestrian coordinator so that fewer families will have to bear the emptiness that I now carry in my heart.

More truth.
Sadly, my jersey covers up this philosophy. But you can still see the coffin…if you are staring at my ass. Pervs!

More truth.

Sadly, my jersey covers up this philosophy. But you can still see the coffin…if you are staring at my ass. Pervs!

Do you think I have enough summer bike clothing? It’s 3-5 deep on every hook. FYI, Craft has replaced DeMarchi as my favorite, but Minneapolis’ Twin Six is right up there.

Do you think I have enough summer bike clothing? It’s 3-5 deep on every hook. FYI, Craft has replaced DeMarchi as my favorite, but Minneapolis’ Twin Six is right up there.

I really hope…

…you guys are watching the velodrome bike racing events of the Olympics. Fixed gear, no brakes, awesome bikes, 40+ degree turns, pushing, shoving, grinding, motor pacing, 40+mph, you can’t make this shit up. As an FYI, we have one of the world’s best velodromes is in Minneapolis at the National Sports Center. 47 degrees in the turns, made from Adzalia wood (before it became illegal to use it), escape velocity 60mph (the speed that would make you go up the track if you crashed). People my size LOVE track racing. 

My old Scott Vertigo World Cup LSD DH bike circa 96/97/98. The frame was designed for Formula disc brakes but none were available in the U.S. at that time. Fortunately, one of the guys on my team was a machinist so we made Hope brakes work which included making a rear mount adapter and a smaller disc to fit the frame (each manufacturer had their own mounting specs back then). The bike came with a spring for someone that weighed 150lbs, no other spring rates were available. I called up Betts Spring to see if they could make one for me (they made most MTB suspension springs). The guy laughed and said I couldn’t afford it. When I told him about the bike he asked me to fax him some info/schematic on it. Two days later he called back and said they really wanted to work on it and would charge me $300 for one spring after originally quoting me thousands. So I sent them the frame and it came back with 6 springs of 2 different types (straight and barrel) in 3 spring rates 3 weeks later. I wound up liking the barrel springs better, less binding in the Rock Shox rear shock near full compression. The Mr Dirt adjustable 6-10’ travel front shock was one of the first upside down triple clamp forks and came with Hope brake mounts (home made tank slappers) with an early version steering damper whose name I have forgotten (maybe Answer?). Very tunable open bath design, heavy but amazing. The front wheel is a Mr Dirt thru axle hub (20mm?) I built up with a double wide Alaska All Season Snow Cat rim, IRC Missile 2.3. One of my Bennett’s bike shop co-workers worked at All Season when he lived in Anchorage and suggested I use them. The rear was built up with a wide Specialized DH rim that had a rubber liner (to help prevent pinch flats) with an XTR hub, some Continental 2.1 “paddle type” tire, go forward and stop, slide out before your front tire. XTR rear derailleur and shifter. Frame was fully adjustable for leverage ratio, rear travel 4-8”, BB height, and head tube angle. I wound up using a Syncros road crank since large MTB chainrings were tough to find. I really had to pull some strings to get the chainguide as Scott had committed to just one arbitrary manufacturer for mounting, again, no standards. Shimano SPD-636 pedals. I wish I still owned this thing. Thanks for indulging me. Google is your friend.

My old Scott Vertigo World Cup LSD DH bike circa 96/97/98. The frame was designed for Formula disc brakes but none were available in the U.S. at that time. Fortunately, one of the guys on my team was a machinist so we made Hope brakes work which included making a rear mount adapter and a smaller disc to fit the frame (each manufacturer had their own mounting specs back then). The bike came with a spring for someone that weighed 150lbs, no other spring rates were available. I called up Betts Spring to see if they could make one for me (they made most MTB suspension springs). The guy laughed and said I couldn’t afford it. When I told him about the bike he asked me to fax him some info/schematic on it. Two days later he called back and said they really wanted to work on it and would charge me $300 for one spring after originally quoting me thousands. So I sent them the frame and it came back with 6 springs of 2 different types (straight and barrel) in 3 spring rates 3 weeks later. I wound up liking the barrel springs better, less binding in the Rock Shox rear shock near full compression. The Mr Dirt adjustable 6-10’ travel front shock was one of the first upside down triple clamp forks and came with Hope brake mounts (home made tank slappers) with an early version steering damper whose name I have forgotten (maybe Answer?). Very tunable open bath design, heavy but amazing. The front wheel is a Mr Dirt thru axle hub (20mm?) I built up with a double wide Alaska All Season Snow Cat rim, IRC Missile 2.3. One of my Bennett’s bike shop co-workers worked at All Season when he lived in Anchorage and suggested I use them. The rear was built up with a wide Specialized DH rim that had a rubber liner (to help prevent pinch flats) with an XTR hub, some Continental 2.1 “paddle type” tire, go forward and stop, slide out before your front tire. XTR rear derailleur and shifter. Frame was fully adjustable for leverage ratio, rear travel 4-8”, BB height, and head tube angle. I wound up using a Syncros road crank since large MTB chainrings were tough to find. I really had to pull some strings to get the chainguide as Scott had committed to just one arbitrary manufacturer for mounting, again, no standards. Shimano SPD-636 pedals. I wish I still owned this thing. Thanks for indulging me. Google is your friend.

Shimano 48H hub tandem wheels built with Sun Rhyno rims, 2.0 DT spokes, brass nipples, 4X. Needed to be strong for downhill follies. Yeah, I built them, my track record for wheel builds is impeccable. Although I feel chagrined that rim tape is showing on the back wheel. It’s Ritchey not Velox. I used to be such an immaculate house cleaner.

Shimano 48H hub tandem wheels built with Sun Rhyno rims, 2.0 DT spokes, brass nipples, 4X. Needed to be strong for downhill follies. Yeah, I built them, my track record for wheel builds is impeccable. Although I feel chagrined that rim tape is showing on the back wheel. It’s Ritchey not Velox. I used to be such an immaculate house cleaner.

It’s a big club. It’s kind of nice to have a local bike clothing brand in your hometown. Twin Six Minneapolis, MN

It’s a big club. It’s kind of nice to have a local bike clothing brand in your hometown. Twin Six Minneapolis, MN

I think my Phonak key fob has been doping. It has lasted longer than any other I have every owned (got it in late ‘97). It is still claiming innocence. Clearly it is dirty. Where is Travis Tygart when you need him?

I think my Phonak key fob has been doping. It has lasted longer than any other I have every owned (got it in late ‘97). It is still claiming innocence. Clearly it is dirty. Where is Travis Tygart when you need him?

43 degree banked turns, 60mph escape velocity (crash at 61+mph to move up the turns when falling down)…the Velodrome at the National Sports Center in Blaine, MN is the best and maybe the fastest velodrome in the world. The last track made with Afzelia wood before it became an endangered species. The wood is so dense it survives MN winters with minimal upkeep but will make you pull thousands of slivers out of your ass/thighs if you crash. Nothing more exciting than being 3 stories high before dropping down into a sprint for the line. $50 track classes, they let you use a real track bike that they provide, give you 4 days of classes, and then a race day to experience all types of events. The best $50 you will ever spend. Bob Williams is your man. Phone: 763.785.5614 Track Hotline: 763.785.5651

43 degree banked turns, 60mph escape velocity (crash at 61+mph to move up the turns when falling down)…the Velodrome at the National Sports Center in Blaine, MN is the best and maybe the fastest velodrome in the world. The last track made with Afzelia wood before it became an endangered species. The wood is so dense it survives MN winters with minimal upkeep but will make you pull thousands of slivers out of your ass/thighs if you crash. Nothing more exciting than being 3 stories high before dropping down into a sprint for the line. $50 track classes, they let you use a real track bike that they provide, give you 4 days of classes, and then a race day to experience all types of events. The best $50 you will ever spend. Bob Williams is your man. Phone: 763.785.5614 Track Hotline: 763.785.5651

Winter commuter drive train overhaul starts tomorrow (the Sugino box is the d-600 crankset 46-36-26) . JIS UN-54 BB, stem, h-bars, cables (brake and shifter) and grips not shown. Sticking with my old Shimano XT 7/8 speed thumbshifters/drivetrain allows me to switch to friction shifting should I mess up my derailleurs and keeps the price on new parts low, which is huge since I actually have to pay for them now. The toughest thing may be cleaning the grime off my bike.

Winter commuter drive train overhaul starts tomorrow (the Sugino box is the d-600 crankset 46-36-26) . JIS UN-54 BB, stem, h-bars, cables (brake and shifter) and grips not shown. Sticking with my old Shimano XT 7/8 speed thumbshifters/drivetrain allows me to switch to friction shifting should I mess up my derailleurs and keeps the price on new parts low, which is huge since I actually have to pay for them now. The toughest thing may be cleaning the grime off my bike.

Crank Brothers Candy 3 going on the DBR Axis TT tomorrow after spending too much time in storage (the pedals more than the bike). I feel very decadent using my old Ti MTB race bike as a winter commuter. The  1997 Manitou EFC “long” travel, 75mm, fork (with after market coil springs) still works well. Maintenance man, maintenance.

Crank Brothers Candy 3 going on the DBR Axis TT tomorrow after spending too much time in storage (the pedals more than the bike). I feel very decadent using my old Ti MTB race bike as a winter commuter. The  1997 Manitou EFC “long” travel, 75mm, fork (with after market coil springs) still works well. Maintenance man, maintenance.

One of my favorite books.

One of my favorite books.

Biking is finally a part of my Achilles’ tendonitis therapy, day two. Low on miles, high on smiles! Wearing a MBRC Flanders jersey in SPBRC Grand Performance territory….hmmm.

Biking is finally a part of my Achilles’ tendonitis therapy, day two. Low on miles, high on smiles! Wearing a MBRC Flanders jersey in SPBRC Grand Performance territory….hmmm.